College of Forestry News

OSU and state officials, with consultation from a stakeholder group, are negotiating terms of a potential agreement for the university to provide research management of the 82,000-acre forest, which is situated in the Coast Range near Reedsport.

A long-term Pacific Northwest study of landslides, clear-cutting timber and building roads shows that a forest’s management history has a greater impact on how often landslides occur and how severe they are compared to how much water is coursing through a watershed.

Douglas-fir trees will likely experience more stress from drier air as the climate changes than they will from less rain, computer modeling by Oregon State University scientists shows.

The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet Jan. 19-20 and hear a briefing on the Elliott State Research Forest, discuss preliminary tuition scenarios and budget planning for the 2024 fiscal year and hear an update on the university’s strategic plan.

The Oregon State University College of Forestry invites community members to participate in a listening session Monday, Nov. 7, regarding the development of a new management plan for the McDonald and Dunn research forests.

An international coalition of researchers says in a report that the Earth’s vital signs have worsened to the point that “humanity is unequivocally facing a climate emergency.”

An 80-foot illuminated art sculpture is currently being installed at Oregon State University’s Corvallis campus, where it will be suspended in midair for the next 14 months among three 80-year-old sequoia trees.

“It’s crucial that we improve our understanding of the factors that influence how fish respond to postfire changes in stream temperature,” said the study’s leader, Dana Warren, a researcher in the OSU colleges of Forestry and Agricultural Sciences.

Faculty in the Oregon State University College of Forestry will team up with Pacific Northwest Tribal nations on a three-year forest restoration effort whose goal is to improve the resilience of the region’s woodlands to climate change through Traditional Ecological Knowledge.

A new study led by Oregon State University suggests leaves in forest canopies are not able to cool themselves below the surrounding air temperature, likely meaning trees’ ability to avoid damaging temperature increases, and to pull carbon from the atmosphere, will be compromised in a warmer, drie